Is it better to save more or work longer?

save more or work longer

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Save more or work longer?

One of the first things I do for new clients is create a detailed retirement plan based on their unique circumstances.  This helps us determine if they’re on track financially for the type of retirement that they want.  Sometimes this exercise produces smiles.  Sometimes not so much.

If a plan is falling short, there are many ways to get it back on track.  You can save more, change your allocation, work longer, work part time, change your Social Security claiming strategy, get out of debt, spend less in retirement or downsize to a smaller house.  The effectiveness of those options varies.

The most obvious tactic is to save more, but the power of saving diminishes as you approach retirement.  Why?  Because each new dollar has fewer years to compound.  A dollar saved at 25 becomes about $22 by retirement (assuming an 8% annual return and retirement age of 65).  A dollar saved at 55 only becomes about $2 by retirement.

A recent report from the National Bureau of Economic Research illustrated this point by showing that saving another 1% of your salary each year for 10 years is only as effective as working for a single month longer.

To explore this idea further and look at the effectiveness of different tactics, I thought it would be interesting to look at an actual retirement plan and see which changes produce the biggest results.  Below is a short video of me working through a plan and testing potential changes to improve the overall success rate of the plan (If you have trouble viewing the video, click through to our site and click on the YouTube link).

 


 

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