Metrics that matter

metrics that matter

I just finished watching the new Ken Burns documentary on Vietnam.  During the war, Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara had commanders and soldiers in the field collecting vast amounts of data each day that was then put onto punch cards and fed into a mainframe computer for analysis.  The hope was that by measuring hundreds of different variables—casualties, villages pacified, roads cleared—they could gauge progress and prove that we were winning the war.

In hindsight, there were many problems with this strategy, not the least of which was that the things they really needed to know—the state of Vietnamese politics, the loyalty of the people, the intentions of Hanoi—were almost impossible to quantify and thus weren’t being factored into the equation.  An Army adviser summarized it this way:

“If you can’t count what’s important, you make what you can count important.”

When I heard him say that, it struck me that you and I do something similar when it comes to life in general and retirement specifically.  There are things that really matter and that have a huge impact on our happiness and fulfillment.  Things like our sense of purpose, the quality of our relationships and the depth of our experiences.  Unfortunately, those things are nuanced and hard to both measure and manage, so instead we tend to focus on things that are easier to quantify like the size of our bank accounts, square footage of our houses or the number of friends we have on Facebook.  There’s nothing necessarily wrong with those things, but they don’t form the complete picture obviously.

This morning I spent time reflecting on the types of metrics I use in my own life and how I can do a better job measuring the things that are important and not just the things that are easy to count.  As a part of that process, I went back and re-read some of my past articles.  If you’d like to do something similar, I’ll post links to those that were particularly helpful to me.

Perspective

Metrics

Application

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