Internal vs External Scorecard

Internal vs External Scorecard

Warren Buffett once said:

“The big question about how people behave is whether they’ve got an inner scorecard or an outer scorecard.  It helps if you can be satisfied with an inner scorecard.”

The scorecard he’s talking about is how you measure success in any given endeavor.  Are you playing your game or someone else’s?  Do you compare yourself to others and try to win based on what they or the rest of the world think of you?  Or do you focus on the things that matter to you and judge your success based on the goals and metrics that you’ve set for yourself (i.e. your internal scorecard)? 

You can “succeed” with either scorecard.  It’s just a question of whether or not that success is likely to bring you happiness and fulfillment.  Most people use a combination of both scorecards, but during the first two-thirds of life the external scorecard often wins.  As a student, you had a literal scorecard and it measured how well you did compared to the other students and whether you reached the milestones of success set by the school.  You likely focused on that scorecard to please your parents or gain acceptance into college or a career. 

During your working years there’s pressure to focus on the external scorecard as well.  Are you the top salesman?  How much money do you make?  What is your job title?  How much is in your 401k?  What professional designations do you have?  What industry awards have you won? 

And since we use the external scorecard at work, we often use it in our personal life as well.  How big is your house?  What kind of car do you drive?  What brand of clothes do you wear?  Where do you vacation?  Are your kids in private school? 

There’s nothing inherently wrong with any of those things, but if the only reason you want them is to please others or win some foolish game of status or achievement, then you’re winning at the wrong game.  It’s possible to look totally successful on the outside and be a mess on the inside.

The internal scorecard and retirement

When you retire, you buy yourself the freedom to design your own game and set your own rules.  You get to decide what constitutes a success.  This is a much more rewarding game to play and it is more likely to result in happiness and fulfillment, because the metrics you’re focusing on are the things that are important to you.  It takes work, however, because you need to create the game and set the rules.  That means deciding what you really want out of life and then holding yourself accountable to achieve it using your internal scorecard.  Your scorecard will look different than mine, so I can’t tell you what to do, but I can give you some general ideas on how to do it.  Below are a few resources that can help.

Ebook:

A Brief Guide to Retirement Bliss

Articles:

Video:

For lasting happiness, get off the hedonic treadmill.

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What won’t change?

What won’t change?

Read this quote from Jeff Bezos and then let’s apply it to retirement.

“I very frequently get the question: ‘What’s going to change in the next 10 years?’ And that is a very interesting question; it’s a very common one. I almost never get the question: ‘What’s not going to change in the next 10 years?’ And I submit to you that that second question is actually the more important of the two — because you can build a business strategy around the things that are stable in time. In our retail business, we know that customers want low prices, and I know that’s going to be true 10 years from now. They want fast delivery; they want vast selection. It’s impossible to imagine a future 10 years from now where a customer comes up and says, ‘Jeff I love Amazon; I just wish the prices were a little higher,’ [or] ‘I love Amazon; I just wish you’d deliver a little more slowly.’ Impossible. And so the effort we put into those things, spinning those things up, we know the energy we put into it today will still be paying off dividends for our customers 10 years from now. When you have something that you know is true, even over the long term, you can afford to put a lot of energy into it.”

What won’t change in retirement?

Bezos was talking about business, but you can just as easily apply his idea to retirement.  Most people spend decades preparing for retirement. If you’re going to do that, you want to make sure that the time, money and energy that you’re investing will get you to where you want to be and will pay dividends for years to come.  So, what won’t change?  What is likely to be just as true 10 or 20 years from now as it is today?  Here are three ideas:

You’ll want to be healthier. I have yet to come across the retiree who doesn’t care about their health.  Everyone wants to be as healthy as possible for as long as possible.  I’m sure the same will be true of you.  So the time and effort you spend on improving and maintaining your health will be well spent.  That could mean making a long-term commitment to eating better.  Or hiring a personal trainer.  Or buying better quality food.  Or going to your doctor for regular checkups.  Or going to a physical therapist to finally treat those aches and pains.  Or flossing (seriously…new research links gum disease to Alzheimer’s).  Or getting that knee or hip replacement surgery that you’ve been putting off.  If it’s an investment in your health, it will pay dividends for years to come.  

You’ll want to be happier. That was true when you were 2.  It was true when you were 20.  It will still be true if you live to be 200.  So think about the things that make you happy and invest in those.  Here are a few suggestions based on happiness research.  Invest in relationships.  Learn new things.  Focus on experiences rather than things.  Work on something bigger than yourself.  Exercise. Meditate or pray.  Spend time outdoors.  Help others.  Get enough sleep.  Forgive. Stop comparing yourself to others.

You’ll want to be more financially secure.  I’m sure everyone has dreamed of winning the lottery, but that’s not what I’m talking about. Financial security simply means you’re not worrying about money at night.  It means having enough to buy your freedom.  Enough to control what you do with your time.  Enough to do the things that you want to do.  Enough to help those you care about if they need help. Enough to take care of yourself if/when your health changes.  Enough to design the kind of lifestyle you want.  The desire for financial security will not change, but it takes most of us a long time to get there.  So be a good steward of your assets.  Save diligently.  Pay off debt. Invest wisely.  Calculate how much you need to fund the retirement you want and make a plan that will get you there.  Hire an adviser if you need help.  Get your finances in order and it will pay dividends (literally) for years to come.  

Quick summary:

Step 1: Decide what won’t change.

Step 2: Invest in those things.

Step 3: Reap the rewards for years to come.

Touch base if I can help.

Be Intentional,

Joe

How to know if you’re ready to retire

How to know if you’re ready to retire

Deciding when to retire isn’t always easy.  Most people just base it on their birthday, but there are other factors you should consider as well. In the video below, I’ll give you seven signs that you’re ready to retire.  

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The pros and cons of early retirement

The pros and cons of early retirement

I’ve worked with many clients over the years who decided to retire early.  Sometimes that was a great decision, other times it resulted in some unexpected challenges.  Below are some of the pros and cons I’ve seen with early retirement.  Consider them carefully as you decide when to retire.  

Pros

Time control.  During your working years, you don’t control large chunks of your day.  If you retire early, however, you shed those demands and have much more flexibility and opportunity to use your time to do the things you really want to do.

Health.  Generally speaking, the younger you are, the healthier you are.  If you retire early, you get to take advantage of the fact that you’re still healthy and active.  

Open doors.  In The Funny Thing About Time, I discussed how time closes doors as we get older.  The kids grow up and move away.  You lose a spouse or other loved one.  Your physical health changes and you’re not able to do that trip you always wanted to do. Retiring early means that more of those doors are still open.

Better relationships.  One of the advantages of having more time is that you can prioritize relationships.  During our working years, we’re less proactive with relationships. It’s a side effect of less time and more obligations.  Early retirement changes that calculus.  And since relationships are key to a happy life, retiring early can be a huge advantage.

Less stress.  This one is pretty self-explanatory.

Potential opportunity for a second career or passion project.  Some retire early because they are ready to leave work/career behind.  Others still want to work, they just want to do something they enjoy or are passionate about without having to worry about what it pays.  Retiring early can give you that opportunity.

Cons

Age difference with other retirees.  I have a client who retired early and moved to a private community in Florida.  He was the youngest resident by several decades. You can feel a little out of place if you’re 50 and everyone around you is 70.  This is obviously more of an issue if you move to a destination geared toward retirees. 

Guilt.  I wrote about this in 4 Unexpected Emotions in Retirement. If you retire early, you can sometimes feel guilty because you’re doing fun stuff while your friends and family are still working.  This can make conversations awkward as you talk to each other about your day, priorities, etc.

Money.  The sooner you retire, the less time you have to save and the longer your nest egg needs to last.  If you are considering early retirement, be sure to work with a trusted adviser to create a detailed retirement plan with a high probability of success.

Comparison with peers.  Alas, comparison with others continues even in retirement.  Your friends and co-workers will likely be a little jealous of your newfound freedom and you’ll likely feel a bit green when you hear about their promotions and raises. You might even second guess your decision to walk away from the challenge and status your career.  The best way to guard against this is to do things in retirement that provide purpose and meaning.

Social Security.  Your Social Security benefits are based on the assumption that you will continue to work until full retirement age.  If you retire sooner, your benefits will be a little lower.  Likewise, if you decide to claim your benefits early (rather than waiting until full retirement age) they will be reduced.  You can retire early and still wait to claim your benefits, but that means that your portfolio will need to do the heavy lifting until you file (see my point on money above).

Health insurance.  If you retire before becoming eligible for Medicare at age 65, you’ll need to get a health care policy that bridges the gap between your employer policy and Medicare.

Timeline vs. Pie Chart

Regardless of when you retire, you’ll be faced with tradeoffs.  If you wait, you get more money, but you lose time and health.  If you retire early, you sacrifice a bit of money, but you’ll be healthier and have a much longer runway to enjoy retirement. You need to decide what’s most important to you.

One piece of advice I can give you: Don’t save the best for last.  Retirement should not be a timeline where youth is 0-20, working years equal 20-65 and retirement is 65 plus. Instead it should be a pie chart divided between time you control and time you don’t. Retirement is using whatever time you control now (whether that’s 10%, 50% or 90%) to live the life that you want to live.  

Be Intentional,

Joe

Three ingredients of a meaningful life

Three ingredients of a meaningful life

Because retirement is a time filled with fun, travel and leisure it is easy to make the pursuit of pleasure your orienting principle.  That would be a terrible mistake.  There’s nothing wrong with pleasure, but it must exist in the context of something deeper.  Let me explain.

Meaning vs. Pleasure

I’ve written before about Viktor Frankl.  He was a psychiatrist and holocaust survivor who wrote the book Man’s Search for Meaning about his time as a concentration camp prisoner.  Frankl founded a school of psychology called Logotherapy (literally “meaning” therapy).  He believed that striving to find meaning is the primary motivational force in humans.  This was in contrast to Freud, who believed that the pursuit of pleasure was the driving motivation.  

I’m in Frankl’s camp.  In my experience with retirees, those who focus on meaning often have a deep sense of satisfaction, purpose and happiness.  Pleasure is a welcome byproduct of their pursuit of purpose. Alternatively, those who can’t find this deeper sense of meaning often self-medicate with pleasure.  Pleasure with no greater purpose eventually feels hollow for most people.  So how can you orient your retirement around meaning?

How to find meaning

According to Frankl, there are three different ways to find meaning in life.  I’ll list those below and then relate them to retirement.

Through projects or work.  All of us are designed to do something meaningful and productive.  Retirement doesn’t somehow remove that need, it just means that you no longer have to base your choice on how much something pays.  Maybe that means working part-time in a field that’s always interested you or volunteering for an organization you’re passionate about.  Or maybe it’s running for your local school board or working on a big community project.  Whatever it is, find something that will engage you and leverage your time, treasure and talents.  What people really need, according to Frankl, is “the striving and struggling for a worthwhile goal, a freely chosen task.”

Through experiences and relationships.  Retirement (and life) is at its best when we have loving, healthy relationships with friends and family and we are engaged in meaningful pursuits.  

Through challenges or suffering.  This one might seem a bit counterintuitive at first, but if you think about the times in your life that made you who you are, that taught you the most, that filled you with pride and a sense of accomplishment, my guess would be that a lot of those times grew out of a significant challenge, heartbreak or tragedy.  Frankl believed that we should welcome challenges and suffering, not because they’re fun, but because they can often bring meaning and growth.  He knew that we can’t always control our circumstances, but we can always control our response to our circumstances.  That from a guy who was in a concentration camp and found a way to redeem his suffering and use it as the soil from which he grew his philosophy, vocation and life’s meaning.

“Between stimulus and response there is a space. In that space is our power to choose our response. In our response lies our growth and our freedom.” – Viktor Frankl

So as you move toward retirement, absolutely plan on doing fun and interesting things. Splurge on yourself. Be a little selfish.  Just don’t treat the pursuit of pleasure as your ultimate goal.  If you do, you’ll likely be disappointed.  Instead, seek meaning and you’ll likely find pleasure and happiness as well.

Be Intentional,

Joe

Use the 4 disciplines of execution to get your retirement dreams off the drawing board

Use the 4 disciplines of execution to get your retirement dreams off the drawing board

When it comes to retirement, you absolutely want to dream big.   Just don’t forget how important it is to eventually get those dreams off the drawing board.  Here’s a simple framework that can help.  It’s called the 4 Disciplines of Execution (4DX for short) and was developed by several people at FranklinCovey and discussed in their book by the same name.

Discipline #1: Focus on the wildly important

The authors of 4DX write: “The more you try to do, the less you actually accomplish.”  It you try to do too much, very little gets done and the things that you do, don’t get done well.  Concentrate your efforts on a few wildly important goals so you can do them well. 

It’s up to you to choose what “wildly important” things to focus on when it comes to retirement.  Here’s my suggestion, informed by almost 25 years of helping people plan for retirement: Focus on money and meaning.  The money will help you sleep at night (and fund the type of retirement you want).  The meaning will give you a reason to get out of bed in the morning. 

Discipline #2: Act on lead measures

Once you identify your wildly important goals, you need to measure your progress toward achieving them.  The authors of 4DX suggest there are two types of metrics you can use to measure your progress: lead measures and lag measures.  Lag measures track the thing you’re actually trying to achieve.  In our example above, having enough money to fund your retirement was one of the goals.  A lag measure would look at whether you’ve reached that goal.  Unfortunately, that comes too late to be helpful.  Instead you want to track lead measures.  Those are the behaviors that eventually lead to successful lag measures.  So in our example of money, lead measures could be things like 401k contributions, savings rates or investment returns.

Discipline #3: Keep a compelling scorecard

“People play differently when they’re keeping score,” the 4DX authors write.  The scoreboard brings out our competitive spirit, drives us to stay focused on lead measures and gives encouragement when we see progress toward the ultimate goal(s).  Returning to our example, maybe your scorecard tracks each pay period that you were able to save a certain percentage of your income.  Or if you’re tracking meaning, maybe your scorecard tracks every time you have a date night with your spouse, take a trip or work at learning a new hobby.  Whatever your lead measures, keep a scorecard to track how you’re doing.

Discipline #4: Create a cadence of accountability

In the final discipline, the 4DX authors say that you need to put in place a “rhythm of regular and frequent meetings of any team that owns a wildly important goal.”  Depending on your goal, that “team” could just be you or it could include others like your spouse, financial adviser, friends, children, etc.  Meet regularly with whoever has a vested interest in the outcomes you’re trying to achieve so you can track your progress and hold each other accountable.

Dreaming without doing is a recipe for disappointment.  The 4 Disciplines of Execution will help you turn your retirement plans into reality.

Quick Note: I recently posted a video to YouTube on the 8 Habits of Successful Retirees.  If you haven’t seen it yet, you can click the link to watch it and click “Subscribe” to see future videos.

Be intentional,

Joe