Two new videos on our YouTube channel

Two new videos on our YouTube channel

I started an Intentional Retirement YouTube channel a few years ago, but haven’t posted anything in a loooong while. Time to change that.  There are several new videos on the channel right now and going forward I’ll try to post new content each week covering both money and meaning. I’d love to have you follow along.  Just click on the two links below to watch the latest or you can go directly to our channel to see everything available.

And please do me a huge favor and click “Subscribe” when you visit our channel. That way you’ll be sure to see the latest content when it’s available and it will help more people find us, because the more that people subscribe and watch, the more YouTube will suggest the videos to others. Thanks a ton. You’re awesome!

YouTube Video #1: 3 Unexpected Emotions in Retirement

In this video I discuss the unexpected emotions that can crop up soon after retiring and give you some strategies for how to cope with them.

YouTube Video #2: Should you pay off your house before you retire?

Hardly a week goes by that I don’t get asked about paying off a mortgage early. In this video I discuss:

  • The things to consider before making a decision
  • The pros and cons of paying off your mortgage before retirement
  • What I did with my house and why

Thanks for reading (and watching).

Be Intentional,

Joe

Here are 5 types of freedom that are essential to a remarkable retirement

Here are 5 types of freedom that are essential to a remarkable retirement

When I say the word “freedom,” what do you think of?  Freedom of speech?  Self-determination? The freedom to choose your own spouse, friends or career path?  Or maybe you envision an open road.  Or a favorite pastime.  Or winning the lottery.  Freedom is not just one thing.  There are many different types, states and levels of freedom.  When it comes to retirement, I think there are five key types of freedom you should strive for.  Those are:

Financial Freedom.  Things cost money.  If you have enough money to pay for the things you want and need, you have financial freedom.  You don’t need to be rich, but you need enough money to fund your ideal lifestyle.  Obviously, that’s a different amount for everyone.  Find out how much it is for you and get to work.  Save more.  Be a good steward of your resources.  Stop spending on things that aren’t important to you.  The more financial freedom you have, the less beholden you are to a job or lender and the more flexible you can be in your life decisions.  Of course, money won’t solve all your problems, but it will usually solve your money problems (to paraphrase Naval Ravikant).  It’s often the table stakes for the other freedoms we’ll discuss below.  

Time Freedom. Think of life as a pie chart that is divided between time you control and time controlled by others. The goal is to gradually shrink the piece of the pie that is controlled by others.  The smaller that piece becomes, the more time freedom you have.  The more time freedom you have, the more retired you are.  Be careful, however.  The most common way to achieve the money freedom we discussed earlier is to trade your time freedom for it.  That can work while you’re building your nest egg, but it’s not a good long-term trade.  The goal is not to be cash rich and time poor.  That’s just prison with a fancy zip code.  The goal is to have financial freedom while simultaneously controlling your time.  

Location Freedom.  Location independence is a key theme at Intentional Retirement.  Being location independent means that you’re not tied to a specific geographic location for work or other reasons.  You are free to move about, explore and experience while still staying on top of work or other obligations.  Pre-pandemic, this was a rarely used and somewhat radical concept.  Post-pandemic, it has become almost normal.  We have the tools and technology to facilitate it and fewer gatekeepers telling us no.  Location freedom is important for obvious reasons.  If the things you have to do are tied to a specific location, they will prevent you from doing the things you want to do that are not.  A caged bird isn’t free. 

Health Freedom.  Think for a minute about how your health can affect your freedom.  For starters, getting sick is expensive.  Health issues often sabotage your financial freedom and can force you to continue working, which undermines your time freedom.  Even worse, being sick or unhealthy will often get in the way of everything else you want to do.  I’m sure many of your plans involve some level of activity.  The worse your health is, the less you’ll be able to do.  Said another way, your health can act as either captor or emancipator.  Better health = More freedom.  

Lifestyle freedom.  Having the first four types of freedom enable you to achieve freedom number five: Lifestyle freedom.  This freedom comes from deciding what you really want out of life and having the time, money, independence and health to pursue those things and make them a reality. 

How are you doing so far?  Any particular area that still needs work?  You can do it.  Just keep in mind that freedom can be tricky.  When you look at the list above, it’s easy to see how acquiring one freedom can cost you another.  That’s less than ideal, obviously.  Figure out all five and you’ll be well on your way to a remarkable retirement (and life). 

Be Intentional,

Joe

3 essential ingredients of the ideal retirement

3 essential ingredients of the ideal retirement

Quick review.  At Intentional Retirement, we believe that retirement is an intentional way of living that prioritizes freedom, fulfillment, purpose and relationships.  It starts today and is an incremental process of aligning your lifestyle and actions with your highest priorities.  

Gone are the days (or at least they should be) when retirement was about how old you are or whether you punch a time clock.  That just puts you on the deferred life plan where you push your dreams off until “Someday” rather than living life to the full now.  Not only that, but it doesn’t give you much time.  If you retire at 65 and stay healthy and active until 75 (a stretch for many) then you’ve got 10 years to do everything you’ve been putting off for the last 40.  Ten years is not enough.

With all that in mind, here are three essential ingredients of an ideal retirement (and life).

Optimal Health.  Here’s an obvious statement: Most of the things you want to do in life require you to be alive.  And not just alive, but healthy and fit.  The healthier you are, the more you’ll be able to do.  So start taking your health seriously.  Ask yourself, “What actions can I take today that will put me on a path to improving my health?”  A few big areas to focus on are what you eat, your vitals (weight, blood pressure, etc.), how much you sleep, how active you are and how good your relationships are.  Pick an area and start working on it. Once you have that dialed in, add something else.

Financial Freedom.  Here’s another obvious statement: Things cost money.  You don’t need to be rich, but you need enough money to fund your ideal lifestyle.  Obviously, that’s a different amount for everyone.  Find out how much it is for you and get to work.  Save more.  Be a good steward of your resources.  Stop spending on things that aren’t important to you.  The more financial independence you have, the less beholden you are to a job or lender and the more flexible you can be in your life decisions.  The goal is to control more of your time.  The more time you control, the more retired you are.  

Purpose.  Neurologist, psychiatrist and holocaust survivor Viktor Frankl said that striving to find meaning in one’s life is the primary, most powerful motivating and driving force in humans.  In other words, we’re hard wired to want purpose and meaning.  But it doesn’t just happen.  You need to work at it.  You need to decide what you really want out of life and start taking those plans seriously.    

Obviously, I’ve written about these things before, but it’s always a good idea to review your core beliefs and recalibrate to true north so your plans will stay on track.  I’ll put a few links below for further reading.  

Be Intentional,

Joe

Time for a mid-year financial checkup

Time for a mid-year financial checkup

Well, we just past the halfway point of 2020.  Five months to go.  Time for a mid-year financial checkup.  I’m a big proponent of doing an annual review each January, but this year has been a bit…unusual…so I encourage you to look things over now and make sure that your retirement plans are still on track.  Here are a few things to focus on as well as a free Financial Checkup Checklist to help.

Investments.  If you’ve been afraid to open your statements or log in to your accounts, it’s time.  Look at where you are, but more importantly, look at where you’ve been.  Markets plunged and then rallied, so you’ll see volatility for sure.  But if it’s more than you can stomach (or more than your plan can handle), it’s time to rethink your risk and allocation.  

Work.  If you lost your job or changed jobs due to the pandemic, you need to re-run your retirement plan and make sure that it still works.  A new job means a different income, different benefits and a different 401k.  Those are all variables in your plan.  If they change, your timeline for retirement might change. 

Savings.  It’s natural to get defensive in the face of uncertainty.  When markets are plunging and the economy looks shaky, it’s easy to quit saving and investing.  I see it all the time.  It’s one thing if you lost your job or your income shrank considerably.  But if you’re still working and you just quit saving out of fear, turn those automatic investments back on.

Budget.  Did your spending change during the lockdown?  Mine sure did.  When you have no idea how bad a downturn will get or how long it will last, it’s natural to reevaluate your spending and reconsider your wants vs. needs.  Ultimately, that’s a good thing.  Nothing impacts your ability to retire quite as much as your retirement budget.  The leaner you can make it, while still doing the things that are important to you, the better off you’ll be.  Cut the fat and optimize your spending for the lifestyle you want.  Here’s a budget worksheet to help.

Debt.  Divide your total debt by your income.  That ratio should get smaller over time.  According to research by Charles Farrell, your Debt/Income ratio should be around 1.0 by age 45 and zero by age 65.  How are you doing?  What would your finances look like if you were debt free?  How would you feel?  What would you do with the extra money?  How soon could you retire?  Make a list of your debts and put together a plan to pay them off.  And if you have a mortgage, consider refinancing while rates are at historic lows.  

Insurance.  Review all your coverages, but pay particular attention to your life insurance.  The pandemic is a good reminder that unexpected things happen.  If your family is depending on your income, then you need to have a plan to replace that income if you die.  A general rule of thumb is to have 7 to 10 times your annual income in life insurance, but you should meet with a trusted adviser to discuss the specifics of your situation.

Legal affairs.  Again, the pandemic is a good reminder that unexpected things happen.  Make sure that your will, powers of attorney and estate plan are accurate, up-to-date and reflect your current wishes.  

One more thing before I go.  Don’t just focus on your finances or legal affairs.  One of the most important ingredients to a successful retirement is to decide what you really want out of life and to start taking those things very seriously.  COVID-19, while terrible, has likely helped you in that regard by forcing you to reexamine your habits, routines, priorities, purpose, relationships, finances, lifestyle, career and any number of other things.  What have you learned about yourself?  Don’t just ignore those lessons and slowly ease back into your pre-pandemic rut.  Design a lifestyle—home, work, leisure—that reflects your priorities and is faithful to what you want out of life.  You still have plenty of time to do that before the end of the year.  Redeem 2020 by turning the disasters and difficulties into a better, more secure, more fulfilling life.

Be Intentional,

Joe

Why COVID-19 may be the best thing to ever happen to your retirement

Why COVID-19 may be the best thing to ever happen to your retirement

“It’s an ill wind that doesn’t blow some good.” – Pa Ingalls in Little House on the Prairie

COVID-19 has been a tragedy.  There’s no disputing that.  Thousands dead.  Millions sick.  Millions more jobless.  It’s hard to overstate the negative impacts of the pandemic.  And yet, to paraphrase Pa Ingalls, even terrible situations can produce some good.  As difficult as this time has been, I can’t help but think that many of us will look back on it as one of the best things to happen to us.  Not in a “I just won the lottery!” sort of way, but in a “Painful, but positive” sort of way.  Keep reading to see what I mean and to see how you can make sure that this “ill wind” blows some good for your retirement.

It forces us out of routine.  It’s easy to get in a rut.  Easy to put life on autopilot and live the same day over and over.  Even if we don’t like the rut we’re in, we’ll often stay there because it feels safe.  Human nature is such that we will often choose being unhappy over being uncertain.  One thing this virus has done in spades is forced us all to live life in a different way.  It grabbed the steering wheel and yanked us out of the rut.  That’s not necessarily a bad thing.  In fact, it’s almost certainly a good thing.  It gives us a fresh perspective.  It helps time pass more slowly (because routine is the enemy of time).  It opens us up to new experiences and new ways of thinking about things.  It presents new opportunities.  Yes, it brings uncertainty, but hiding in all that uncertainty is opportunity.  Look for it.

It forces us to reexamine our priorities.  Priorities are the things in life that are most important to us.  They are the people, activities or things that we really care about and that bring us meaning.  When life is going along swimmingly and we’re healthy and have plenty of time and money, we tend to get lazy.  We allow things in that clutter or confuse our priorities.  When life gets hard, however, and one or more of our priorities are threatened, it refocuses our mind on what’s important.  Hard times force us to cut and say “no.”  They force us to get back to the basics.  That means a life less cluttered with filler and more focused on the things that bring you joy and meaning.  That’s a good thing.

It forces us to think differently about debt.  When the economy is strong and interest rates are low, it’s tempting to add debt.  You almost feel foolish if you don’t.  “One percent interest?  Why wouldn’t I buy a $60,000 car?”  But when hard times hit, servicing that debt becomes difficult if not impossible.  Debt increases risk and reduces cash flow.  It adds stress.  It can derail your plans and dreams.  It weakens your financial “immune system.”  The pandemic is a good reminder to use debt sparingly.  

It shows the fallacy of “appearances.”  On a sunny day, a house built on the sand doesn’t look any different than a house built on rock.  But when the storms come, the difference is pretty clear.  It’s easy to get caught up in appearances.  It’s tempting to keep up with the Jones’s.  But even in the best of times, that strategy can be stressful and unfulfilling.  In bad times it can be catastrophic.  Machiavelli once wrote “The great majority of mankind are satisfied with appearances, as though they were realities.”  Don’t be one of those people.  Build a life that is happy, secure and fulfilling, not one that only looks good on Instagram.

It exposes our weaknesses.  Warren Buffett once said “It’s only when the tide goes out that you learn who has been swimming naked.”  There’s nothing like a combination global pandemic + financial crisis to help expose your weaknesses.  Too much risk in your investments?  Too much debt?  No rainy day fund?  Strained relationship with your spouse?  Underlying health issues you’ve been ignoring?  Settling for a life that isn’t what you want?  If the tide went out and you find yourself a bit overexposed, maybe it’s time to go shopping for a swimsuit.

One of the most important ingredients to a successful retirement is to decide what you really want out of life and to start taking those things very seriously.  COVID-19, while terrible, has likely helped you in that regard by forcing you to reexamine your habits, routines, priorities, purpose, relationships, finances, lifestyle and any number of other things.  Embrace that process and you’ll likely come out the other side a stronger, more resilient, more self-aware person.  

What are some practical ways to apply all this?  I’ll put a few ideas below along with links to articles and resources at Intentional Retirement.

Be Intentional,

Joe

How to optimize your life for retirement

How to optimize your life for retirement

To optimize something is to “make it as perfect, effective or functional as possible.”  That’s a good goal for retirement.  After all, you only have one shot at it, so make it the best it can be.  Here’s how to optimize your life for retirement.

Control your time. Think of life as a pie chart that is divided into time you control and time controlled by others. The goal is to gradually shrink the piece of the pie that is controlled by others.  The smaller that piece becomes, the more “retired” you are.  The more time you control, the more you can focus on the things you want to do rather than the things you have to do.  How do you control more of your time?  The primary way is to be financially independent, so make sure your finances are on track.

Optimize your location.  The American Enterprise Institute recently published a study on how location affects happiness.  They concluded that people who live closer to the things they want to do are happier, more involved, more satisfied with life and less likely to be lonely.  Kind of a no brainer, right?  If you love to ski, live close to the mountains.  If you want to spend time with your kids, live in the same city.  And the study found that proximity works for small things too.  If you live near a multitude of amenities—the coffee shop, gym, community center, restaurants—you’ll likely get out more, feel less isolated and be happier. 

Hack your health.  A hack is a trick or method that increases efficiency.  I have a friend who recently started a physical therapy practice that focuses on prevention rather than recovery.  I think the idea is a brilliant hack.  Similar to the dentist, you go in twice a year for evaluation and a checkup.  He takes some baseline measurements and looks for problems.  Then he asks what types of things you like to do (e.g. hike, ski, golf, garden, run, tennis, etc.) and gives you exercises that will allow you to do those things for as long as possible.  I like to hike, so we’re working on leg strength, balance, joints and endurance.  The idea is to keep me healthy and active doing the things I want to do for as long as possible.  How about you?  What types of things do you want to be able to continue doing as you age?  Schedule some time with a local physical therapist and ask them to help you optimize your health for the lifestyle that you want to live.

Be specific.  At the risk of sounding obvious, you have a much greater chance of accomplishing a goal if you know exactly what it is you want to do.  If you want your retirement to run smoothly, make specific plans. 

Take some at bats.  One of the biggest mistakes I see some people make is that they constantly defer their dreams.  The best advice I can give you today is to start taking some at bats.  Right now.  Even if you’re not retired.  Especially if you’re not retired.  The worst that can happen is that things don’t work out and you get rolled a little bit, so you dust yourself off and try something different.  Ironically, that’s also one of the best things that can happen, because that failure is feedback.  It turns out we’re pretty terrible at knowing what’s going to make us happy.  The more stuff you try, even if you don’t end up liking it, the better idea you’ll have of what’s important to you, who’s important to you, what you like, what you dislike, what makes you happy and what you’re passionate about.  That makes you more self-aware so you can design an optimized life that takes you where you want to go.

Be a system thinker.  Retirement has a ton of moving parts that need to work together to produce the results that you want.  Those parts include things like money, relationships, pursuits, Social Security, Medicare, healthcare, distribution planning, tax planning, housing and insurance to name a few.  Those parts work together in a complex system.   If the parts work, the system works.  If one or more parts isn’t functioning properly, the system breaks down.  To optimize your life for retirement, make sure that each part of that system is working as it should.  Some parts you’ll be able to handle on your own.  For other parts, you’ll likely need to enlist the help of people like your accountant, financial adviser or doctor.

Simplify.  As you take more control of your time and plan your transition into retirement, make a “Stop Doing” list.  Certain things will no longer be relevant to your new plans.  Go through all your activities, obligations and commitments and decide what needs to go.  Once finished, your schedule will be much less cluttered and you will be able to use your time more efficiently.  Do the same thing with the physical clutter in your life. 

Retirement is not a one size fits all proposition.  By focusing on the items mentioned above and tailoring them to your unique situation, you can optimize your life for the retirement that you want. 

Be Intentional,

Joe