How decision drift leads you away from the life you want

How decision drift leads you away from the life you want

Hi everyone.  Sorry it’s been kind of quiet around here.  I’ve been in summer mode and haven’t done much writing.  I just got back from a hike with my daughter through the High Divide – Seven Lakes Trail in Olympic National Park (see above pic) and the hike got me thinking about some of the research I’ve read on surviving in the wilderness.

A common thread running through most survival stories is the idea of decision drift.  Most times you don’t just make one terrible decision that puts you into a “Do or Die” scenario.  Rather, you make a series of small decisions that get you further and further from where you need to be until you come to the sudden realization that you are lost or in trouble.  The sense of panic that accompanies that realization often causes people to make more irrational decisions that get them deeper into trouble. 

Decision Drift and Retirement

Decision drift isn’t exclusive to back country hiking.  It can affect you on your path to retirement as well.  Most of us do a pretty good job avoiding those colossally bad decisions that can derail our life.  We’re less good at those myriad small decisions that seem unimportant at the time but, when taken cumulatively, can derail our life or get us far from where we want to be.  Those decisions can greatly affect our relationships, health, financial well-being and opportunities and we often make them without a lot of intention because:

  • We think they’re unimportant
  • We feel pressured or tempted
  • We’re temporarily willing to compromise
  • We’re unclear on what we want
  • We haven’t considered the consequences
  • We failed to decide so someone else is deciding for us

All of those little decisions/indecisions can quietly lead you away from the life you want to live.  You  wake up one day and realize you’re lost.  You ask yourself: “Where am I?  How did I get here?  Whose life am I living anyway?”  Avoid that sinking feeling by recognizing that those little decisions are big.  Pay attention to them and course correct as needed.  Never forget that most decisions – big or small – are directional. They lead you toward certain things/people/experiences/opportunities and away from others.  Don’t take them lightly.  Be intentional with your decisions so they take you where you want to go.

Be Intentional,

Joe

How to know if you’re ready to retire

How to know if you’re ready to retire

Deciding when to retire isn’t always easy.  Most people just base it on their birthday, but there are other factors you should consider as well. In the video below, I’ll give you seven signs that you’re ready to retire.  

Note: If you are viewing this video in an email, it may not display properly.  Click this link to watch the video in YouTube.  And be sure to subscribe to our YouTube channel if you’d like to see future videos.

The pros and cons of early retirement

The pros and cons of early retirement

I’ve worked with many clients over the years who decided to retire early.  Sometimes that was a great decision, other times it resulted in some unexpected challenges.  Below are some of the pros and cons I’ve seen with early retirement.  Consider them carefully as you decide when to retire.  

Pros

Time control.  During your working years, you don’t control large chunks of your day.  If you retire early, however, you shed those demands and have much more flexibility and opportunity to use your time to do the things you really want to do.

Health.  Generally speaking, the younger you are, the healthier you are.  If you retire early, you get to take advantage of the fact that you’re still healthy and active.  

Open doors.  In The Funny Thing About Time, I discussed how time closes doors as we get older.  The kids grow up and move away.  You lose a spouse or other loved one.  Your physical health changes and you’re not able to do that trip you always wanted to do. Retiring early means that more of those doors are still open.

Better relationships.  One of the advantages of having more time is that you can prioritize relationships.  During our working years, we’re less proactive with relationships. It’s a side effect of less time and more obligations.  Early retirement changes that calculus.  And since relationships are key to a happy life, retiring early can be a huge advantage.

Less stress.  This one is pretty self-explanatory.

Potential opportunity for a second career or passion project.  Some retire early because they are ready to leave work/career behind.  Others still want to work, they just want to do something they enjoy or are passionate about without having to worry about what it pays.  Retiring early can give you that opportunity.

Cons

Age difference with other retirees.  I have a client who retired early and moved to a private community in Florida.  He was the youngest resident by several decades. You can feel a little out of place if you’re 50 and everyone around you is 70.  This is obviously more of an issue if you move to a destination geared toward retirees. 

Guilt.  I wrote about this in 4 Unexpected Emotions in Retirement. If you retire early, you can sometimes feel guilty because you’re doing fun stuff while your friends and family are still working.  This can make conversations awkward as you talk to each other about your day, priorities, etc.

Money.  The sooner you retire, the less time you have to save and the longer your nest egg needs to last.  If you are considering early retirement, be sure to work with a trusted adviser to create a detailed retirement plan with a high probability of success.

Comparison with peers.  Alas, comparison with others continues even in retirement.  Your friends and co-workers will likely be a little jealous of your newfound freedom and you’ll likely feel a bit green when you hear about their promotions and raises. You might even second guess your decision to walk away from the challenge and status your career.  The best way to guard against this is to do things in retirement that provide purpose and meaning.

Social Security.  Your Social Security benefits are based on the assumption that you will continue to work until full retirement age.  If you retire sooner, your benefits will be a little lower.  Likewise, if you decide to claim your benefits early (rather than waiting until full retirement age) they will be reduced.  You can retire early and still wait to claim your benefits, but that means that your portfolio will need to do the heavy lifting until you file (see my point on money above).

Health insurance.  If you retire before becoming eligible for Medicare at age 65, you’ll need to get a health care policy that bridges the gap between your employer policy and Medicare.

Timeline vs. Pie Chart

Regardless of when you retire, you’ll be faced with tradeoffs.  If you wait, you get more money, but you lose time and health.  If you retire early, you sacrifice a bit of money, but you’ll be healthier and have a much longer runway to enjoy retirement. You need to decide what’s most important to you.

One piece of advice I can give you: Don’t save the best for last.  Retirement should not be a timeline where youth is 0-20, working years equal 20-65 and retirement is 65 plus. Instead it should be a pie chart divided between time you control and time you don’t. Retirement is using whatever time you control now (whether that’s 10%, 50% or 90%) to live the life that you want to live.  

Be Intentional,

Joe

Use the 4 disciplines of execution to get your retirement dreams off the drawing board

Use the 4 disciplines of execution to get your retirement dreams off the drawing board

When it comes to retirement, you absolutely want to dream big.   Just don’t forget how important it is to eventually get those dreams off the drawing board.  Here’s a simple framework that can help.  It’s called the 4 Disciplines of Execution (4DX for short) and was developed by several people at FranklinCovey and discussed in their book by the same name.

Discipline #1: Focus on the wildly important

The authors of 4DX write: “The more you try to do, the less you actually accomplish.”  It you try to do too much, very little gets done and the things that you do, don’t get done well.  Concentrate your efforts on a few wildly important goals so you can do them well. 

It’s up to you to choose what “wildly important” things to focus on when it comes to retirement.  Here’s my suggestion, informed by almost 25 years of helping people plan for retirement: Focus on money and meaning.  The money will help you sleep at night (and fund the type of retirement you want).  The meaning will give you a reason to get out of bed in the morning. 

Discipline #2: Act on lead measures

Once you identify your wildly important goals, you need to measure your progress toward achieving them.  The authors of 4DX suggest there are two types of metrics you can use to measure your progress: lead measures and lag measures.  Lag measures track the thing you’re actually trying to achieve.  In our example above, having enough money to fund your retirement was one of the goals.  A lag measure would look at whether you’ve reached that goal.  Unfortunately, that comes too late to be helpful.  Instead you want to track lead measures.  Those are the behaviors that eventually lead to successful lag measures.  So in our example of money, lead measures could be things like 401k contributions, savings rates or investment returns.

Discipline #3: Keep a compelling scorecard

“People play differently when they’re keeping score,” the 4DX authors write.  The scoreboard brings out our competitive spirit, drives us to stay focused on lead measures and gives encouragement when we see progress toward the ultimate goal(s).  Returning to our example, maybe your scorecard tracks each pay period that you were able to save a certain percentage of your income.  Or if you’re tracking meaning, maybe your scorecard tracks every time you have a date night with your spouse, take a trip or work at learning a new hobby.  Whatever your lead measures, keep a scorecard to track how you’re doing.

Discipline #4: Create a cadence of accountability

In the final discipline, the 4DX authors say that you need to put in place a “rhythm of regular and frequent meetings of any team that owns a wildly important goal.”  Depending on your goal, that “team” could just be you or it could include others like your spouse, financial adviser, friends, children, etc.  Meet regularly with whoever has a vested interest in the outcomes you’re trying to achieve so you can track your progress and hold each other accountable.

Dreaming without doing is a recipe for disappointment.  The 4 Disciplines of Execution will help you turn your retirement plans into reality.

Quick Note: I recently posted a video to YouTube on the 8 Habits of Successful Retirees.  If you haven’t seen it yet, you can click the link to watch it and click “Subscribe” to see future videos.

Be intentional,

Joe

Strategies of retirement super savers

Strategies of retirement super savers

The general idea behind retirement is to reach a point of financial independence where work is optional and you control your time.  How fast you get there depends largely on how much you save and how much you need to live on during retirement.  The math is pretty simple.  The more you save and the less you need, the faster you will be financially independent.  How can you ratchet up your savings and reach your goals faster?  For some ideas, let’s look at the habits and tactics of super savers (people who save 30-50 percent of their take home pay).

How to save half your income

First, let’s address the elephant in the room.  “Wait Joe, Did you say 50 percent!?!”  Indeed I did.  That might sound ludicrous to most of you, but let me prove to you that it’s possible.  Think about how much money you make.  Got it?  Ok.  No matter what number you have in your head right now, there are millions of people in the U.S.—some of whom no doubt are your friends, neighbors and co-workers—living on half that.    Say your income is $100,000.  Almost half the country is currently living on half that.  Or maybe your income is $50,000.  There are tens of millions living on half of that.  So living on half of whatever number you have in your head right now is not only possible, it’s apparently pretty easy.  Millions of people are already doing it.  The trick is to spend like them, even though you’re making twice as much.  Do that and your savings rate will skyrocket.  Let’s look at how super savers do it and then consider how to apply those lessons.

Strategies of Super Savers

They focus on maximizing income.  Super savers focus on income, not just expenses.  They realize that the more money they make, the easier it will be to cover a comfortable lifestyle and still have plenty left over to save.

They avoid lifestyle bloat. Most people allow lifestyle bloat as they get older.  As income grows, so do expenses.  Bigger paychecks mean better houses, cars, vacations, wardrobes and gadgets.  If you spend everything you make, you’ll never be financially independent.  Super savers try to buy their freedom as soon as possible by capping their lifestyle and saving the rest. 

They have clear priorities and goals.  Super savers understand what’s important to them and what’s not.  They have clear retirement goals.  They have a vision for their future.  They know what they really want out of life and they are taking those plans very seriously.

They are self-aware and secure.  Because super savers take the time to think about what’s important to them, they are less likely to make purchase decisions based on expectations, peer pressure, vanity, a pushy salesperson or the need to keep up with the Joneses.  Instead, they spend liberally on things that provide them with a solid ROI and miserly on things that don’t.

They make things simple and automatic.  Super savers automate their savings by having the money automatically deducted from their paychecks and/or bank accounts.

They are organized and intentional.  Saving large chunks of your income doesn’t just happen.  In fact, the path of least resistance is to spend everything you make.  Super savers are disciplined and intentional about earning, saving and spending.  They track their progress and regularly try to improve.

They have aggressive goals. I have a theory.  Our collective failure to adequately prepare for retirement is partly due to the fact that our target (mid 60s) is so far out in the future when we start our careers.  There’s no sense of urgency.  Super savers have aggressive goals that don’t allow for complacency. 

They use debt sparingly.  Debt allows you to bring future purchases into the present.  You get the fancy doodad now in exchange for the promise to keep working so you can pay for it over time.  Super savers understand this calculus.  They realize that you don’t add debt, you exchange future years of your life for it.  And since they hold those future years dear and want to control their time, they use debt very sparingly.

It’s not about the job.  For the most part, super savers aren’t trying to quit working.  They’re trying to get to the point where work is optional and they have greater leverage in choosing the type of work or other activities that they do.

How to buy your freedom faster.

I wrote this article, of course, in the hopes that it would inspire some of you to ratchet up your savings rate and thus buy your freedom faster.  Here are a few simple ways to apply the strategies discussed above.

Inventory.  The first step is a quick inventory of your current financial situation.  The goal is to get an overview of how much you earn and where that money is going.  Grab a pay stub and calculate your annual after-tax income.  Make a list of what you’re currently saving in your different accounts (e.g. 401k, IRA, etc.).  Review your budget to see where you’re currently spending.  Again, the idea with this is just to get a clear picture of how much money is coming in and where it’s going.

Define your priorities.  Next, think about what’s important to you.  What do you actually want to do in this life?  When would you like to retire and how much money do you need to fund that lifestyle?  What goals do you have?  What types of purchases do you view as most worthwhile?  The idea here is to define your priorities and goals so you can allocate your resources more efficiently.  You want to invest in things that are important to you and stop spending on things that aren’t. 

Set an audacious savings goal.  How much are you saving?  Nothing?  3 percent?  10 percent?  Whatever the number, set a stretch goal to drastically improve your savings rate.  Something that will give you a sense of urgency and force you to put forth major effort. 

Track. I’ve been experimenting with savings rates myself for the last two years.  To help, I created a simple spreadsheet that has a column for my income, columns for each of my accounts and a column for my mortgage.  Then each time I get a paycheck, I list my after-tax income in the income column and then enter the amount of savings in each of the other columns (e.g. 401k, IRA, HSA, etc.).  I’m trying to pay off my mortgage quickly, so I count extra payments there as savings. 

Reallocate. Increasing your savings rate takes time because the extra money you want to save is already allocated somewhere else.  In some cases, it will be easy to reallocate it.  If you eat out regularly, but that isn’t a high priority, then stop eating out and send that money to savings instead.  Other things take a little more time (e.g. paying off credit card bills) or more effort (e.g. lifestyle changes like downsizing your house).  As you get rid of past indiscretions and reorder your priorities, your savings rate will rise and you’ll reach your goals faster.  Not only that, but you’ll also be less stressed about money and more satisfied with your lifestyle because you’re spending on things that matter to you.

Be Intentional,

Joe

Do your actions match your aspirations?

Do your actions match your aspirations?

Happy New Year!  It’s that wonderful time of year when we all get a blank slate and a chance to make a resolution or two.  That got me thinking about actions and aspirations.  What if I told you that my goal for 2019 was to become an Olympic swimmer, but I never got in the pool?  Or if I said I wanted to write the great American novel, but never bothered putting pen to paper?  How confident would you be that I’d reach my goal?  Not very, right?  That’s because most people realize that major accomplishments require major effort.  You’re not going to achieve an exceedingly rare outcome by putting forth a mediocre effort.  Said another way, your actions need to match your aspirations.

How about this one:  What if I told you I want to retire someday.  Big deal, right?  Actually, it is.  We take it for granted because it has become so ingrained in everyday life, but when you think about what retirement really is, it’s a wonder anyone can do it.  Retiring is like saying: “I want to quit my job tomorrow and never work again, but I want to be healthy enough and have enough money to do fun and exciting things and also maintain my standard of living for 30 years or so.”  Seriously?! I think most of us have a better shot at the Olympic team.  

The 1% Life

I recently saw a video of writer/speaker/businessman Gary Vaynerchuck talking to a young man who was describing the kind of career he wanted—meaningful work that paid handsomely but gave three to four months off each year for travel.   He was lamenting that it wasn’t happening and asking for advice.  Gary asked him several questions that made it pretty clear that, aside from daydreaming, the kid wasn’t putting forth much effort to get his dreams off the drawing board. This was Gary’s response (and I’m paraphrasing): Look, you’re asking for a 1% life.  In other words, a life that is so unique and amazing that only 1% or less of the people in the world get to experience that.  What you’re asking for is ridiculous and you’ll have to do ridiculous things to have any hope of making it a reality.  So you’re asking for this 1% life, but you’re not really doing anything to achieve that.  If you want a 1% life, you need to do 1% things.

To borrow Gary’s phrase, retirement is a 1% life.  And if you want to make that 1% life a reality, you need to do 1% things.  And I’m not just talking about money.  Finding meaning is pretty darn hard as well.  There are plenty of retirees who are cash rich and lifestyle poor.  

Unfortunately, we often treat retirement like it’s a 99% life that happens to everyone as long as you make a few 401k contributions and maintain a pulse.  It’s not that easy.  You won’t reach your retirement goals by simply having a certain number of birthdays.  It takes financial stewardship, intention, hard work, effort and sacrifice.  It takes deciding what you really want out of life and taking those plans seriously.  It takes being proactive.  It takes experimenting and practicing so you can refine your plans and get good at actually doing stuff.  It takes building into your relationships and working on your marriage.  It takes eating right and exercising so you can maintain your health.  All of those things are in your control, but they’re not necessarily easy.  But neither is retirement.  It’s rare and unlikely.  It’s a 1% life.  Are you doing 1% things to get there?  Stick around because I’ve got a ton of stuff coming your way this year that will help. Here are two that you’ll see in your inbox soon:

January Health Articles

I don’t care how much money you’ve saved, retirement won’t work without your health. Take care of yourself so you can get out there and enjoy life. Follow along at Intentional Retirement during January and I’ll post several health-related articles and resources to help you start the year off right.

aMUSEments

Sometimes you just need a little inspiration.  A muse, if you will.  With that in mind, each Friday in 2019 I’m going to send out a quick list of the coolest and most interesting things I’ve found that week relating to retirement.

The list might include trip ideas, articles, products, quotes, retirement tips or anything else that looks interesting or inspiring.  The goal is to give you a quick dose of motivation as you head into your weekend.  Keep an eye out for the first one in a few days.

~ Joe