Do your actions match your aspirations?

Do your actions match your aspirations?

Happy New Year!  It’s that wonderful time of year when we all get a blank slate and a chance to make a resolution or two.  That got me thinking about actions and aspirations.  What if I told you that my goal for 2019 was to become an Olympic swimmer, but I never got in the pool?  Or if I said I wanted to write the great American novel, but never bothered putting pen to paper?  How confident would you be that I’d reach my goal?  Not very, right?  That’s because most people realize that major accomplishments require major effort.  You’re not going to achieve an exceedingly rare outcome by putting forth a mediocre effort.  Said another way, your actions need to match your aspirations.

How about this one:  What if I told you I want to retire someday.  Big deal, right?  Actually, it is.  We take it for granted because it has become so ingrained in everyday life, but when you think about what retirement really is, it’s a wonder anyone can do it.  Retiring is like saying: “I want to quit my job tomorrow and never work again, but I want to be healthy enough and have enough money to do fun and exciting things and also maintain my standard of living for 30 years or so.”  Seriously?! I think most of us have a better shot at the Olympic team.  

The 1% Life

I recently saw a video of writer/speaker/businessman Gary Vaynerchuck talking to a young man who was describing the kind of career he wanted—meaningful work that paid handsomely but gave three to four months off each year for travel.   He was lamenting that it wasn’t happening and asking for advice.  Gary asked him several questions that made it pretty clear that, aside from daydreaming, the kid wasn’t putting forth much effort to get his dreams off the drawing board. This was Gary’s response (and I’m paraphrasing): Look, you’re asking for a 1% life.  In other words, a life that is so unique and amazing that only 1% or less of the people in the world get to experience that.  What you’re asking for is ridiculous and you’ll have to do ridiculous things to have any hope of making it a reality.  So you’re asking for this 1% life, but you’re not really doing anything to achieve that.  If you want a 1% life, you need to do 1% things.

To borrow Gary’s phrase, retirement is a 1% life.  And if you want to make that 1% life a reality, you need to do 1% things.  And I’m not just talking about money.  Finding meaning is pretty darn hard as well.  There are plenty of retirees who are cash rich and lifestyle poor.  

Unfortunately, we often treat retirement like it’s a 99% life that happens to everyone as long as you make a few 401k contributions and maintain a pulse.  It’s not that easy.  You won’t reach your retirement goals by simply having a certain number of birthdays.  It takes financial stewardship, intention, hard work, effort and sacrifice.  It takes deciding what you really want out of life and taking those plans seriously.  It takes being proactive.  It takes experimenting and practicing so you can refine your plans and get good at actually doing stuff.  It takes building into your relationships and working on your marriage.  It takes eating right and exercising so you can maintain your health.  All of those things are in your control, but they’re not necessarily easy.  But neither is retirement.  It’s rare and unlikely.  It’s a 1% life.  Are you doing 1% things to get there?  Stick around because I’ve got a ton of stuff coming your way this year that will help. Here are two that you’ll see in your inbox soon:

January Health Articles

I don’t care how much money you’ve saved, retirement won’t work without your health. Take care of yourself so you can get out there and enjoy life. Follow along at Intentional Retirement during January and I’ll post several health-related articles and resources to help you start the year off right.

aMUSEments

Sometimes you just need a little inspiration.  A muse, if you will.  With that in mind, each Friday in 2019 I’m going to send out a quick list of the coolest and most interesting things I’ve found that week relating to retirement.

The list might include trip ideas, articles, products, quotes, retirement tips or anything else that looks interesting or inspiring.  The goal is to give you a quick dose of motivation as you head into your weekend.  Keep an eye out for the first one in a few days.

~ Joe

4 Days in Italy

4 Days in Italy

Home again, Home again.

Apparently I can travel faster than I can write.  I made it home Tuesday in the small hours of the morning, but I still have several articles I want to share with you including about my time in Italy and Germany as well as my reflections on and lessons from the trip.  I’ll send those your way over the next week or so. Thanks so much for following along and keeping me company over 18 days and 25,000 plus miles.  It was a fun experience!

Italy

After wrapping up my time in France, I took an early morning flight to Naples, Italy where I had a car service waiting to drive me about an hour and a half to a little seaside town on the Amalfi Coast called Positano.  During the planning stages of the trip I read that parking a car in Positano is a difficulty on par with splitting the atom, so I decided to save myself the frustration and just use the aforementioned car service.  The cost was surprisingly reasonable and talking to the different drivers (I used it for several trips) about the economy, politics, their families, the culture and more was a kick.  Plus, the guy who picked me up from the airport was named Fredo so I instantly felt like I had been dropped onto the set of The Godfather (best movie ever).

When we arrived in Positano, I was reminded of a line from Orwell’s Down and Out in Paris and London where he described the houses on the narrow street where he lived as “lurching towards one another in queer attitudes, as though they had all been frozen in the act of collapse.”  Imagine pushing an entire town over a steep cliff and then somehow freezing the picture as the houses, buildings and roads spilled toward the sea.  That is Positano.  It’s beautiful, but it seems to defy the laws of physics.

Fredo dropped me off at the Hotel Marincanto where I checked in with the usual questions (Just you? Is that backpack your only luggage?) and then found my way to the hotel restaurant for lunch.  It’s hard to imagine a meal with a better view.  My table was outside on a veranda that was covered with flowers and lemon trees (Limoncello originated on the Amalfi Coast) and looked down the hillside at the crashing waves below.  My waitress was a friendly Italian woman who age-wise could have been my mother and who, like my mom, took joy in providing a good meal. I ordered the ravioli and a beer. She asked me what kind of beer and I told her to surprise me.  “Ah, Peroni for you,” she said.  When I later complimented her on her choice of beers, she brought me another, gratis.  Smiling, she said: “Is good, no?”

Stomach full, I decided to do a little exploring.  As you might imagine from my earlier description, walking the streets of Positano is like doing a Stairmaster workout with the machine on “Everest” mode, but the shops and scenery reward you for the effort.

The itinerary for Italy was designed to give me a little downtime after the breakneck pace of Hong Kong and France.  I had four days instead of three and the only scheduled activity I had was a tour of Pompei and Mount Vesuvius.  The rest of the time was earmarked with exploring Positano, hiking the paths above the town and working.  A typical workday started with breakfast and cappuccinos in the hotel restaurant and then writing, answering emails, calling clients and running trades in my makeshift office on the balcony outside my room.

Makeshift office on the balcony outside my room.

Pompeii and Vesuvius

Visiting the ancient Roman city of Pompeii and the volcano that buried it meant taking a day trip back into Naples.  After the solitude of Positano, Naples felt raw and frenetic.  I met the tour group near the train station and we took a small bus to Pompeii.  Vesuvius erupted in 79 AD, burying the town in 20 feet of volcanic ash.  Heat was the main cause of death, however, with temps reaching nearly 500 degrees Fahrenheit as far as 6 miles away from the crater.

The ash preserved the town, leaving people and animals frozen in time.  The bodies eventually decomposed and left voids in the ash that excavators—hundreds of years later—filled with plaster.  The result were eerie 3D casts that tell the story of those panicked final moments.  After the tour we walked to a local restaurant for pizza (which originated in Naples) and then took the bus to Vesuvius.  From the parking lot it was about a mile hike/climb to the top where steam vents remind you that the volcano is still active (it last erupted during WWII) and where you can see Pompeii off in the distance.

Path of the Gods

I got up early the morning after Naples and worked until about 3 pm.  With a few hours of daylight remaining, I hopped the local bus and road it to the final stop in the Nocelle neighborhood at the very top of Positano. There is a trail there called the Path of the Gods (Il Sentiero degli Dei) that links Positano with the tiny hilltop town of Agerola.  With my limited daylight, I couldn’t hike the entire thing, but I did enough to recognize that the path came by its name honestly.  The views were really breathtaking.  After returning to Nocelle, I thought about taking the stairs—about 1,500 of them—back to my hotel, but descending the dark, uneven stairs without a headlamp seemed like a surefire way to test out my health insurance, so I walked to the bus stop instead and caught the last bus of the evening.

Watching the sun set from the Path of the Gods.

On to Munich

The next morning I packed, had a few final cappuccinos, said goodbye to the staff and then walked up to the rooftop of the hotel (street level) to wait for my ride.  Stepping out the door, I heard a hearty “Bonjourno Joe!” and looked up to see Fredo.  About halfway through the ride to the airport he asked me if I had time to stop for an espresso.  He took me to his local coffee shop and ordered two espressos made with Kimbo, the local brew.  We stood at the bar (there were no seats in the small café) and were each handed a small cup of orange flavored sparkling water to cleanse our palates.  The perfectly pulled espresso shots came 30 seconds later. We clinked glasses, downed the contents in one shot and it was on to Munich.

~ Joe

3 days in France

3 days in France

France is a few days in my rear-view mirror, but I still wanted to share a few quick stories about my time there.  I flew from Hong Kong to London to Paris (HKG to LHR to CDG in airport parlance), picked up a rental car and drove a few hours to the charming town of Bayeux in the Normandy region of France.  I rented a little flat on a quiet back street and used that as a jumping off point for several days of adventure.

Just walking around the town was an experience.  I’m always awed by how old everything is in Europe.  The origins of the town of Bayeux can be traced back to a Gallo-Roman settlement in the first century BC.  It has survived a number of invaders over the years, from the Viking raids in the 9th century to Hitler in the 20th.  I was fascinated by the cathedral, which is 1,000 years old, and the central role it played in William the Conqueror’s invasion of England (Visit our Facebook page for a bit more on that story and to see a short video I took of the bells ringing one night as I walked back to my flat).

I chose Bayeux, because I wanted to tour the World War II sites around Normandy.  My wife and I were in Paris several years ago and my one regret from that trip was that we didn’t have time for a Normandy day trip, so I wanted to right that wrong.

D-Day sites

To make the most of my time, I hired an experienced guide named Colin McGarry.  He’s originally from England, but met and married a French girl years ago and has been guiding around Normandy since the 1980’s.  He met me at me flat the morning after my arrival and we drove first to Omaha Beach.  He spent time talking about the big themes of the invasion (e.g. strategy, logistics, etc.), but also took a deep dive into many personal stories and recollections of both Americans and their German counterparts on that day of days. I’ve read several books on World War II and watched a number of films like Band of Brothers and Saving Private Ryan, but nothing can quite bring that history alive like walking the beach where so many struggled ashore or running your hand over the broken concrete and twisted rebar of a German machine gun nest.

From the beach, we took the short drive up to the American Cemetery and spent time discussing how it came to be, the soldiers that are still missing and the upcoming 75th anniversary next year.  We also walked to dozens of specific graves where Colin told me stories of heroism and heartbreak from D-Day as seen through that particular soldier’s eyes.  Throughout the rest of the day, we visited a number of other sites around the area including Utah Beach, Pointe du Hoc, St. Mere Eglise, Brecourt Manor, St. Mere du Mont and Carentan.  The entire day was both fascinating and, as you might imagine, very moving.  If you enjoy history, I’d encourage you to add Normandy to your to-do list and if you want to do it with a guide, hire Colin.  He was wonderful.  Touch base with me and I’ll send you his contact info or you can Google his name and track him down on the internet.

Mont Saint-Michel

The next day I drove a few hours south and west of Bayeux to Mont Saint-Michel.  It is a small island, a few hundred meters off shore, that has a population of about 50 and is home to a famous monastery built in the 8th century.  Because it is relatively close to shore, the island is completely surrounded by water during high tide, but is accessible to visitors when the tide is out.  I paid a few Euro for an audio guide and spent time walking from building to building and room to room around the 17-acre site, learning about the hundreds of years of history that preceded my visit.  I finished around noon and was starting to get hungry, so I stopped into a small restaurant for lunch and ordered a meal that the island has become famous for: a very fluffy omelet.  When it first arrives, you think you will have a hard time eating it all, but when your fork slices through it, you realize it has an omelet texture on the outside and an airy fluff of egg bubbles on the inside. The best way I can describe it is to imagine the head of foam on a beer.  That is the texture of the inside of the omelet.

An unexpected surprise

Hunger satisfied, I returned to my car and punched in the coordinates for a little town called Villedieu-les Poêlles.  Before leaving home, I read an article about a famous cookware company in the town called Mauviel 1830.  My wife loves to cook, so I thought I’d swing by the town, tour the copper workshops and see if I could find her a gift that she would enjoy and, perhaps more importantly, would fit in my backpack.  When I got to the town, I stopped by the tourism office for directions and learned that Mauviel was not the only artisan factory in the town.  In fact, the town was loaded with craftsmen (and women) who, along with their predecessors, had been practicing their trades there since the middle ages.

One in particular that sounded fascinating to me was a bell foundry that is the source of the bells for many of the famous cathedrals in France and around the world.  A tour was 8 euros, which ended up being the bargain of the trip.  Touring the foundry and learning about the process (little changed for hundreds of years) that goes into making a bell was fascinating.  When hired to produce a bell, the craftsman chalks the weight of the bell and the name of the church onto the wooden beam above his station. Then, using a mixture of clay, horse manure and goat hair, he crafts an interior and exterior mold for the bell that, when fitted together, leave a cavity inside where the molten brass is poured. That all sounds difficult enough, until you learn of the complex math involved in calculating the appropriate shape and thickness of the bell so that it will ring the desired note (requested by the church) in perfect pitch over its 250-year life.  Today, the calculations are performed by computer.  For the hundreds of years prior, the craftsmen had only their brain power, pencil and paper to do the math.  Again, it was all really fascinating.  Visit our Facebook page for pictures.

After the tour, the day was growing short and I still had a 4-hour drive back to Paris, so I hit the road. I made it to the airport around 10 pm, dropped off the rental car and took a taxi to my hotel.  After a few hours sleep, it was back to the airport for an early morning flight to Italy and the next leg of the trip.  More on that soon.  Thanks for following along.

Be Intentional,

Joe

What are you afraid of?

What are you afraid of?

What are you afraid of?  Be honest. We all have stuff that scares us. Maybe it’s something big.  Maybe small.  Regardless of what it is, the outcome is often the same: Stasis.  Fear acts as a roadblock that keeps us from doing something.  Fear is often the great preserver of the status quo.  It keeps you from having that uncomfortable conversation with your spouse or friend.  It keeps you from going to the doctor.  Or asking for a raise. Or joining the gym.  Or dealing with an addiction.  Or moving to a new town.  Or changing jobs.  Or starting a business.  Or making new friends.  Or traveling. These fears, big and small, stop us in our tracks and the longer we allow them to persist, the more insurmountable they seem.

But here’s the thing. Almost every fear that you and I have—those things that have been holding us back for years and that are keeping us from the things that we genuinely want from life—can be overcome with a few seconds of uncomfortable action.  It reminds me of that quote from Matt Damon’s character in the movie We Bought a Zoo:

“Sometimes all you need is 20 seconds of insane courage.  Just literally 20 seconds of embarrassing bravery and I promise you something great will come of it.”

This is true because fear isn’t something that persists for very long in the face of action.  Once you start, the fear subsides and you focus on the action at hand.  In that sense, inaction is much more uncomfortable than action because the fear and anxiety of inaction is a long-term state.  We marinate in it, sometimes for years.  Once you start, however, and push through the fear with a short burst of bravery, the fear subsides and your focus shifts to whatever it is that you’re doing.

I’m writing about this idea because I’ve had constant reminders about it on this trip.  When traveling, especially internationally, there are dozens of little fears that crop up.  Not being able to speak the language.  Driving a rental car in a strange city.  Figuring out the subway.  Those things can make you want to curl up in a ball in your hotel room and cry.  Fortunately, inaction isn’t really a choice.  Scared of driving?  Too bad.  You’ve got 100 cars behind you.  Subway make you nervous?  Unless you want to sleep at the airport, you’d better take a stab at it.  So you do.  And…hey…what do you know!  You figure it out.  Maybe you didn’t do it perfectly, but you survived.  You learned something and built a bit of confidence that you can keep in your back pocket for the next challenge.  More importantly, fear vanquished, you get to do the thing that you’ve been wanting to do.  String a bunch of those together and you have a life that is rewarding and untarnished by regret.

So I’ll ask again: What are you afraid of?  Whatever it is, you have a choice.  You can let it fester and keep you from the life you want or you can muster 20 seconds of bravery and take the first step toward resolution.  Choose the former and you’ll likely be miserable.  Choose the latter and you’ll wonder why you didn’t do it sooner. Good things are just on the other side of an impermanent barrier that can be breached with a few seconds of bravery. What are you waiting for?

“Do not be too timid and squeamish about your actions. All life is an experiment. The more experiments you make the better. What if they are a little coarse and you may get your coat soiled or torn? What if you do fail, and get fairly rolled in the dirt once or twice? Up again, you shall never be so afraid of a tumble.”    ― Ralph Waldo Emerson

Next destination

I wrapped up my time in France yesterday and hopped an early morning flight to Naples, Italy.  From there I came to a little seaside town on the Amalfi Coast called Positano.  I’ve got four days here with a few concentrated on work and a few for activities (e.g. visiting Pompei and Vesuvius, hiking the Sentiero degli Dei (Path of the Gods), etc.).  I’ll get a post up soon filling you in on my time in France.  Thanks for following along!

Be Intentional,

Joe

3 days in Hong Kong

3 days in Hong Kong

Greetings from Hong Kong! The trip has been great so far.  The flight from LA was a bit of a marathon (I slept for eight hours and still had time to watch four movies), but the payoff has been worth it.  The city is a super interesting mix of people, cultures and activities.  In many ways it is one of the most developed cities in the world.  The public transportation system is the best I’ve ever used, the cityscape is jaw dropping and the restaurants and shopping are top notch.  In other ways it feels a bit exotic.  You can haggle for goods at local street markets, buy unusual food at street stalls or spend hours just exploring the endless streets and back lanes.

There is so much to do, that three months wouldn’t be enough to do it justice.  That’s good news though, because no matter how long your itinerary, you’ll have plenty to fill your days with enough left over to warrant a return trip.  I only had three days, so I hit the ground running.  I landed about 8 in the morning, went through immigration, picked up my pre-purchased train pass from the MTR counter and headed into town.  The airport is on an island outside the city, but the train whisks you from that island to Kowloon and then to Hong Kong.

I found my hotel with no trouble, but it was too early to check in, so I just dropped my bag (“Excuse me sir.  Is this your only bag?”) and went out to grab some food.  My brother-in-law is a pilot and told me about a local chain called Tim Ho Wan that has good food at a reasonable price.  As luck would have it, there was one nearby, so I walked there and managed to order a tasty lunch by pointing at things on the menu and hoping for the best. The food was good, but I also ended up having company.  The restaurant was crowded and I was sitting by myself at a small table when a woman and her daughter walked up and asked if they could sit with me because there were no other seats.  That’s not something you’d expect in the US, but it was great.  The woman was originally from Hong Kong, but they now lived in London and were just back visiting her mother.  They were kind enough to help me plan out my day and gave me some recommendations for things to see and do.

I eventually got checked into the hotel and spent some time in the upstairs lounge catching up on work and communicating with clients, friends and family back home.  That done, I went out for more exploring, the highlight of which was probably the Temple Street night market which is block after block of stalls selling everything from electronics and paintings to souvenirs and street food.  I’m traveling light, so I didn’t buy any souvenirs, but the atmosphere was great.

My big activity on Day 2 was a hike called the Dragon’s Back that I booked on Airbnb.  I met my guide (an ex-pat from Australia named Alex) and fellow hikers at the Shau Kei Wan MTR station and we took a bus outside the city.  The hike follows a jagged ridge line that looks like a dragon’s back for about 5 miles and it ends at a little beach town called Tai Long Wan (Big Wave Bay) where we had a cold beer and a swim in the South China Sea to cool off.  It was a fantastic experience.  Thanks to Rory, the founder of Wild Hong Kong and our guide Alex for offering such a unique adventure.

Today I’ve got some work I need to do in the morning and then this afternoon, I plan on visiting Victoria Peak (great views of the city).  Tonight I’m going to the horse races at Happy Valley where races have been held since 1846.  I’m told that it’s THE place to be on Wednesday night.  From there, I’ll hop the train to the airport where I’ll catch a midnight flight to London and then another flight to Charles de Gaulle airport in Paris.  I’ll pick up a car there and head west to Normandy (I saw Paris on a previous trip) where I’ll be staying in the town of Bayeux.  I hired a guide to take me on a tour around the beaches, cemeteries and other sites related to D-Day and World War II.  It should be fun.  Thanks for following along.

Be Intentional,

Joe

Around the world in 18 days

Around the world in 18 days

A few years ago, my family and I took a one month mini-retirement to Ireland and England.  Before that trip, we applied for two British Airways Visa cards (one for my wife, one for me).  Each card gave 100,000 frequent flier miles for signing up and meeting a minimum spend.  We used some of the miles on that trip, but most of them have been sitting unused (dumb!).  I recently got an email that said the miles were about to expire, so I did what most people would do.  I booked an 18-day, 25,000-mile trip around the world.  I’m leaving soon and I’d love to have you follow along.

A bit about the trip

I’ll keep the specific destinations under wraps for now, other than to say I’ll be leaving home and flying west.  My itinerary has 10 flights and I’ll be spending time in 4 countries (plus two more for connecting flights).  That’s waaaaay more stops than I would normally recommend for a trip of this length, but I’m not really looking at the trip as a relaxing vacation.  Instead I’m viewing it as a bit of a combo between a work trip and a lifestyle experiment that will give me some interesting things to write about at Intentional Retirement (as well as our Facebook page).  I’m able to connect into my work computer remotely and I have a phone plan that works seamlessly in 170 countries, so I’ll be communicating with clients and working a “normal” day most days.  I also have some fun activities booked at each destination, so I’ll be writing about those, as well as about things like how I plan trips, how to pack, demystifying travel, spontaneity, being proactive in retirement, designing your ideal lifestyle, taking risks, finding your purpose, location independence, remote work, overcoming excuses and living an intentional life.

Why?

The expiring miles were a good excuse, but truth be told, the trip has a bigger purpose.  My goal with Intentional Retirement is not just to sell books or write articles, but to help people actually make positive changes in their lives.  To nudge them from apathy to action.  So I hope the trip is fun and interesting, but mostly I hope it inspires you, in some small way, to get your own dreams off the drawing board.

Up next

Next week I’ll post an article or two about how I plan trips and what I’m packing for this trip (hint: almost nothing).  Then I’ll hit the road.  I’ll be posting articles to the site as I go, but I’ll also be posting some pictures and videos to our Facebook page, so follow along there to see the good, the bad and the ugly of how the trip is going.  And if you have any friends who might be interested in following along (or who, like you, want to live an intentional, meaningful life), please email this article to them or share it on social media.  Have a great weekend!  And as always…

Be Intentional,

Joe