My number one takeaway from travel roulette

travel roulette

I recently played a game of travel roulette with my friends.  We showed up at the airport at 5 am with no tickets and no plans and told the ticket agent we’d go anywhere warm.  The only conditions were that the flight had to leave that morning and cost less than $500.  After running through half a dozen potential destinations, we ended up with the last four seats on a direct flight to Phoenix.  The trip couldn’t have gone better.  We had a blast.

This post started out as a handful of lessons and takeaways from that experience.  It included my thoughts on spontaneity, the declining cost of distance, the demystification of travel, the benefits of packing light, living a proactive life and allocating your resources based on your priorities.  Then I erased all of that and instead decided to write about only one key takeaway: Relationships.

Many times during the trip, as we laughed and had fun, I thought to myself “It’s so great to do stuff like this.”  After reflecting a bit more, however, that initial thought evolved into “It’s so great to have people to do stuff like this with.”  In other words, the hero of the story isn’t the experience, it’s the people.  The friendships.

In What makes a good life? I wrote about the Study of Adult Development that Harvard has been conducting for the last 80 years.  The key finding of that study is that relationships and social connections are really, really good for us.  Those with close relationships were happier, healthier and they lived longer than those who self-described as lonely or lacking friends.

Psychologist and author Susan Pinker has done research that resulted in similar conclusions.  In her popular TED talk “The secret to living longer may be your social life” she discussed the importance of friends.  She cited a study that attempted to answer the question “What reduces your chances of dying most?”  You can probably guess where this is going.  Here are the variables in the study ranked from least powerful impact on longevity to greatest:  clean air, hypertension treatment, lean vs. overweight, exercise, cardiac treatment, flu vaccine, quit boozing, quit smoking, close relationships, social integration/interaction.   Just like the Harvard study, this research shows that relationships are critical.  Ms. Pinker went so far as to say that those who prioritize their face-to-face relationships over time create a biological force field against disease and decline. 

Self-reflection

Now that we know how important relationships are, each of us should do a little self-examination and reflection.  How many close friends do you have?  Are you proactive in making and maintaining your friendships?  How is your relationship with your spouse, children and other family?  How much time, energy and money are you investing in relationships?

Application

All of this obviously has huge implications for your retirement.  As I’ve said many times before, retirement is more than a math problem.  Money is important, but so are relationships.  Don’t take them for granted.  They will affect how happy you are and how long you’ll live.  Reflect on some practical ways that you can be more intentional with your relationships.  Here are a few ideas:

  • Focus on the little things. Small gestures can make a big difference.  Send a card to say thank you or to let them know you appreciate them.  Call to catch up.
  • Look for ways to help. Bring a meal when a friend is sick.  Be a shoulder to cry on when they’re going through a tough time.
  • Organize activities. One way to strengthen bonds is through shared experiences and memories.  Organize a book club.  Arrange a movie night.  Plan a trip.
  • Be trustworthy and a good listener. Nothing will end a friendship faster than gossip, backbiting or a lack of empathy.
  • Be quick to fix problems. Don’t let small issues fester.  Admit when your wrong.  Forgive when you’ve been wronged.
  • Start a group. We have a close group of friends that we’ve been meeting with every Sunday night for the last 22 years.  We had no kids when we started and now the kids outnumber us.  We travel together, share meals together, laugh and cry together, pray for and support one another, and generally experience life together.  We’ve been through the best and worst that life can throw at you and I wouldn’t trade them for the world.  Having a friend is great.  Having a group of friends is even better.  Consider starting a group around shared interests, activities, life stage, beliefs or whatever.
  • Lay the groundwork for retirement. If you’re planning on moving somewhere new in retirement, start visiting that place now to make new friends.  Talk with current friends to see if they have any interest in landing there as well.

3 Responses to “My number one takeaway from travel roulette”

  1. Michele Lastovica January 26, 2018 at 1:53 pm #

    Great post Joe! Thanks for the reminder about relationships. Living in the country, commuting, and working full-time can sometimes make us home bodies. Then we realize 3-4 weeks (or more) have gone by and we haven’t seen anyone socially!

    I bought a ticket to Phoenix at the spur of the moment a week ago! I’m leaving tomorrow to spend a couple days visiting my folks who are vacationing there. For years they’ve asked their daughters to visit them on their vacations, but I never took the time to do it. Work can wait. (I spent considerably less than $500 though!)

    • Joe Hearn January 27, 2018 at 12:45 pm #

      Thanks for sharing Michele! That’s awesome. I’m sure the time with your folks will be really worthwhile. I’m glad your ticket to Phoenix was more reasonable than mine. It turns out they give you a discount if you buy it more than 5 minutes in advance. Who knew? 🙂

  2. Lynn ~ Encore Voyage January 28, 2018 at 12:18 pm #

    I love this post, the idea of “travel roulette,” and your insight that it is more about the friendships! I love exploring new things! Just got back from Phoenix/ myself – I’m preparing a post now…we’ll have to compare notes. But the fun of exploring new places has much more to do with the people! Hubs and I love wandering together, but I also think it’s neat to cultivate friendships with similar interests who might enjoy the journey as well. We leave next month for Kauai with another couple. We’ll see how this goes! ~ Lynn

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