12 Tips for a healthy retirement

12 Tips for a healthy retirement

Are you trying to take better care of yourself this year?  Great!  We enjoy having you around.  Here are 12 simple ways to be healthier, both now and in retirement.

Forgive.  Researchers have discovered a link between forgiveness and physical health.  One study showed that people who forgive have fewer coronary problems than people who hold grudges.  Other studies show that those who forgive have less anger, less depression, decreased anxiety and more hope for the future.  The research also shows that forgiveness improves your mood and makes you more optimistic.  Don’t let old wounds fester.  Forgive and move on.

Volunteer. Several large studies show that volunteering can have positive effects on your health and well-being.  Doing good deeds can reduce stress and lower cortisol levels which can strengthen your immune and cardiovascular systems and ultimately lengthen your life.  Use some of your extra time in retirement to volunteer.  Chances are it will make you healthier and happier.

Find purpose and meaning.  Studies show that when you feel like your life has purpose and meaning, you will experience less stress (and the negative health effects it produces), you’ll be better able to cope with challenges and you’ll be more inclined to take better care of yourself.  Studies also show that having purpose makes people more likely to be physically active and more likely to use preventative health services like getting a cholesterol check or prostate exam.  Looking for ways to find purpose and meaning?  Read this: 15 Practical ways to live a purposeful life.

Get rid of belly fat.  A recent study published in the British Journal of Nutrition showed a strong correlation between belly fat and cognitive abilities as you age.  Those with higher levels of belly fat performed worse on cognitive tests and they were also more likely to develop diabetes or have a heart attack. 

Eat less.  Maybe you’ve heard the expression, “You can’t outrun your fork.”  If you’re trying to lose the belly fat mentioned above, focus on how much you eat rather than just exercise.  You need to burn about 3,500 calories to lose a pound.  Most people could trim 500 calories per day if they shrunk their portion size or cut back on snacking.  That would result in a pound per week of weight loss.  To burn the same calories running, you’d need to run about 5 miles per day or 35 miles per week.  Exercise is good, but most of us aren’t running an ultra-marathon every week, so watch the Ben and Jerry’s instead.

Retire sooner rather than later.  According to research done by the National Bureau of Economic Research, retiring can improve your overall happiness and health.  The research found that life satisfaction improves immediately for retirees and their health improves gradually over a period of years.

Retire later rather than sooner.  There are other studies that show that retiring later (after 65) may extend your life. I suspect this has to do with the quality of your pre-retirement life.  If you have a fulfilling career, staying in the workforce can help you stay socially and mentally engaged and reduce the risk of certain diseases.  If you hate your job and have plenty of friends outside of work, retiring sooner (as mentioned in #6) might provide more benefits.

Meditate/Pray. Meditation carries a number of benefits.  It reduces stress, anxiety and blood pressure.  It improves self-awareness and can help you sleep better.  It helps you live more in the present.  It can improve emotional health and reduce age related memory loss.  There are several apps that can help you with meditation, including Calm and Headspace.

Don’t smoke.  This one pretty much goes without saying.

Get enough sleep.  The research on sleep has gotten pretty compelling.  Most adults need between 7 and 9 hours of sleep per night.  Getting enough sleep can strengthen your immune system, help you maintain a healthy weight and help reduce your risk of serious health problems like diabetes and heart disease.  It can also improve your mood and help you to get along well with others, which will help with # 11.

Work on your relationships.  Retirement is a risky time for relationships.  Death can take a spouse or close friend.  Leaving work might alter key relationships or social interaction.  Friends might retire and move away.  Those are all bad, because loneliness is linked to poor health and early death.  In fact, loneliness has the same impact on mortality as smoking about 15 cigarettes per day.  The takeaway?  Invest in friendships.  Invest in your family.  Work on your relationship with your spouse.  Being lonely and isolated can kill you.

Exercise.  We all know that exercise is important, but recent research shows just how important it is to retirees.  Not only does regular exercise reduce your risk of heart disease, diabetes and stroke, but a recent study by Cardiff University showed that exercise was the single biggest influence on whether or not study participants developed dementia.  If you want to maintain your faculties and have a healthy, active retirement, then get regular exercise.

A Long Life vs. A Good Life

A Long Life vs. A Good Life

Hardly a day goes by that I don’t see an article about how to live a longer life.  Drink coffee.  Don’t drink coffee.  Eat a paleo diet.  Be a vegetarian.  Do yoga. Meditate.  Do this to avoid Alzheimer’s.  Do that to minimize the risk of prostate cancer.  Of course, there’s nothing wrong with wanting to be healthy and live a long life, but what about actually having a life worth living?  Isn’t that more important?

A long life is good, but only if you’re healthy, happy and fulfilled.  So try to get your recommended fruit and veg, but don’t forget why you want those extra years to begin with.  Is it just to be alive?  To check off another year on planet earth?  Or is it to actually use those years to live a meaningful life?  Of course, everyone would say it’s the latter, but our actions don’t always reflect that. We procrastinate.  We don’t take our plans and dreams seriously.  We put things off until “someday.”  How can we do better?  Below are a few practical ways to add life to your years (rather than just years to your life).  Each is punctuated with a quote taken from the essay On the Shortness of Life by Seneca.

Spend

Carl Sandburg once said “Time is the coin of your life.  It is the only coin you have and only you can determine how it will be spent.”  A few extra years would be great, but how have you spent the last 10 years?  How are you spending this year?  How about today?  Stop wishing for more time and start actually using the time you have wisely.

“It is not that we have a short time to live, but that we waste a lot of it. Life is long enough, and a sufficiently generous amount has been given to us for the highest achievements if it were all well invested. But when it is wasted in heedless luxury and spent on no good activity, we are forced at last by death’s final constraint to realize that it has passed away before we knew it was passing.”

Simplify

Don’t spend your precious time and money pursuing and maintaining a lifestyle that isn’t what you want.  That feels pointless and toilsome.  Decide what’s important to you.  Invest in that.  Cut out everything else.

“It is inevitable that life will be not just very short but very miserable for those who acquire by great toil what they must keep by greater toil. They achieve what they want laboriously; they possess what they have achieved anxiously; and meanwhile they take no account of time that will never more return.”

Start

One of the biggest unintended consequences of “planning for retirement” is that it trains us to procrastinate.  Yes, it’s important to save for your future, but that doesn’t mean ignoring your present.  Life is meant to be lived.  If you’re trading the very best of your present for some uncertain future, you’re doing it wrong.  Plan for your future.  Make the most of your present.  Those things aren’t mutually exclusive.

“Putting things off is the biggest waste of life: it snatches away each day as it comes, and denies us the present by promising the future. The greatest obstacle to living is expectancy, which hangs upon tomorrow and loses today. You are arranging what lies in Fortune’s control, and abandoning what lies in yours. What are you looking at? To what goal are you straining? The whole future lies in uncertainty: live immediately.”

Be Intentional,

Joe

Two studies show how to boost your memory and extend your life

Two studies show how to boost your memory and extend your life

The biggest fear BEFORE retirement is money.  Pre-retirees worry about whether they’ve saved enough and if it will last.  The biggest fear AFTER retirement, however, is health. Once retired, people worry most about getting or staying healthy so they can do the things they want and have a good quality of life.  So, depending on where you fall on the retirement spectrum, health is either already a major concern of yours or it soon will be.  With that in mind, a few studies caught my eye recently that I want to share with you because they can help boost your memory and extend your life.

How blood pressure affects your memory.  A recent study by the National Institute of Health (NIH) examined whether more aggressive treatment of blood pressure could improve heart health.  The results were so impressive that they stopped the study early and lowered the systolic blood pressure recommendations from 140 to 120 (and overall blood pressure recommendations to no more than 120/80).  That more aggressive treatment reduced the risk of heart attack and stroke by nearly a third and death by almost 25 percent.  They did further research to see if there were any other benefits and last week they announced that bringing the systolic below 120 also reduced the risk of cognitive impairment by about 19%.  Cognitive impairment can lead to dementia which can lead to Alzheimer’s.  The takeaway?  Go get your blood pressure checked and if it’s above 120/80 you should talk to your doctor about bringing it down.

How relationships affect your health.  While I was reading about the blood pressure study, another NIH study caught my eye.  It summarized the growing body of evidence that shows how strong relationships and social connections can have a positive impact on your mental and physical health.  Here are a few of the findings:

  • Relationships have a cumulative impact on your health over time.
  • People with weaker relationships and social connections are much more likely to die prematurely.
  • Weak social ties are directly linked to a higher probability of developing conditions like heart disease, high blood pressure and cancer.
  • Once you develop those conditions, you’re more likely to die from them if you have weak social ties. For example, heart patients with weak social connections are twice as likely to die of cardiac arrest than patients with strong social connections.
  • Weak relationships also affect your immune function and your ability to recover from illness.

Why do relationships have such an impact?  One reason is that behavior explains roughly 40% of premature mortality and relationships have a positive impact on our behaviors.  You tend to take better care of yourself when you have people you care about.  Another reason relationships help?  Good relationships reduce stress and help foster a sense of meaning and purpose, both of which can help improve your mental and physical health.  The takeaway?  Work hard to foster meaningful relationships with friends and family. It can greatly impact your overall health, longevity and quality of life.

Money is an important ingredient to a successful retirement, but it’s meaningless if you’re not healthy enough to live life and do the things you want to do.  So work hard to get your finances in order, but take these words from Emerson to heart: “The first wealth is health.”

Be intentional,

Joe

Memento Mori

Memento Mori

Memento Mori.  In English it means: “Remember that you will die.”

This has been a tough couple of weeks for me.  My mom died very unexpectedly after a brief illness.  On January 29th, I met her for dinner to celebrate her 67th birthday.  We had a wonderful time.  On February 5th, she was hospitalized with what turned out to be a terrible infection.  On February 9th, she was gone.

One week, we were talking, laughing and telling stories over a nice meal.  The next week, in the small hours of the morning, I sat by her hospital bed, held her hand and told her I loved her as I watched her last heartbeat move weakly across the monitor.  I don’t have the words to convey how jarringly painful that was.

Still, I’m grateful.  Grateful to have had her as my mom.  Grateful to have always had a wonderful relationship with her.  Grateful to have made some new memories just a week before she died.  And yes, grateful for the reminder of mortality.  The Memento Mori.   One of my favorite verses is Psalm 39:4.

“Show me, Lord, my life’s end and the number of my days;
let me know how fleeting my life is.” 

I like that verse because I often need the reminder.  I know I’m going to die, but I don’t always live like I believe it.  Maybe some of you are guilty of that too.  If so, consider this your reminder.

If you died today, would you go in peace without a single regret?  Or would you, like most of us, feel bad about the things left undone or unsaid?  The relationship that needs mending?  The affairs that need to be put in order?  Sit with those thoughts this week.  Write them down.  And then act.  You know what you should do.  So do I.  The challenge is to make sure that knowing transitions into doing and believing becomes behaving.  You and I have been given an amazing gift: Today.  Use it wisely.

~ Joe

The best tool for retirement health expenses

The best tool for retirement health expenses

There is a lot of uncertainty with healthcare lately, but two trends will likely continue: It will continue to get more expensive and you will continue to be responsible for more and more of the costs.  Even with Medicare, it is estimated that the typical retiree will need between $200,000 and $400,000 to pay for health expenses during retirement.  With that in mind you should seriously consider using a Health Savings Account (HSA) to help fund your retirement health expenses.  You might be using one now, but if you’re like most, you’re not using it to its full potential.  Let’s change that.

What is an HSA?

An HSA is a tax advantaged medical savings account available to people enrolled in high deductible health plans.  Think of it as an IRA for your medical expenses.  Unlike IRAs, however, HSA money is triple tax free: going in, as it grows and coming out.  That is a huge advantage.  The only caveat is that you need to spend the money on qualified health expenses or you’ll pay taxes and a penalty.  The list of qualified expenses is rather long and even includes things like long-term care insurance premiums.  Here are a few quick facts on HSAs:

  • Contributions are tax deductible.
  • The assets in the account grow tax free.
  • Withdrawals for qualified medical expenses are tax free.
  • If you take the money out for non-qualified expenses, you will pay taxes and a 20% penalty.
  • Unlike FSAs, HSA dollars are not “use it or lose it.”
  • Contributions can be made by either you or your employer.
  • 2017 annual contribution limits are $3,400 for an individual and $6,750 for a family.
  • Those over age 55 can make an additional $1,000 catch-up contribution each year.
  • Money in the HSA can be invested in stocks, bonds and mutual funds.

A few things change at age 65…

  • Distributions after age 65 are never subject to a penalty, even if not spent on qualified medical expenses. For non-qualified expenses just pay the taxes and use the money for whatever you want.
  • At 65 you can pay for all Medicare premiums except Medigap with tax free HSA distributions.
  • Once you enroll in Medicare, you can no longer make contributions to an HSA, but you can continue to use the existing money in your HSA.

Your best strategy

HSAs are growing in popularity, but they are not being used to their full potential.  Because of the HSA triple tax advantage (in, out and during), the money should be invested for growth and allowed to compound as long as possible.  Instead, here’s how most people use their HSA: 1) Add some money, 2) Leave the money in a no risk/no return money market, 3) Use the money as soon as they incur a medical expense.

Here’s how you should use your HSA: 1) Contribute the maximum amount allowed each year, 2) Invest the money in stocks, bonds and/or mutual funds, 3) If possible, pay for your current medical expenses out of pocket and allow your HSA money to grow until you retire.  By doing that you are getting the most bang for your buck and creating a pot of money for retirement that can be used tax free for medical expenses or for anything else as long as you pay the tax.

~ Joe

What makes a good life?

What makes a good life?

What makes a good life?  Now there is a question with universal appeal!  Who wouldn’t want to know, in advance, what types of things would make them healthier, happier and more fulfilled?

Unfortunately, research shows that we’re not very good at predicting what will make us happy.  I call this the “I want to be rich and famous and then all my problems will be solved!” fallacy.

Just because we’re not good at predicting, however, doesn’t mean that we’re destined to a lifetime of trial and error in search of the holy grail of happiness.  There is plenty of research on what works.  Indeed, one of the longest studies has been going on for the last 75 years.

It’s called the Harvard Study of Adult Development.  Started in 1938, the study follows two groups of people.  The first group was made up of 268 Harvard sophomores.  The second group was made up of 456 young men from inner-city Boston.

Every other year, researchers follow up with the surviving study participants and interview them extensively about everything from their finances and careers to their relationships and social activities.  Then every five years, they do an extensive evaluation of each participant’s health, including x-rays, blood tests and echo cardiograms.

Robert Waldinger, the current director of the study (he is the 4th over the past 75 years), detailed some of the key findings in his excellent TED Talk.  Here is a summary:

  • Relationships and social connections are really, really good for us. They make us happier and healthier and they help us live longer.  Those in the study with good relationships experienced all of those positive outcomes.  Those in the study who described themselves as lonely, however, had a shorter life expectancy, reported being less happy and had worse mental and physical health.
  • The quality of our relationships makes a big difference. The better the relationships, the more positive benefits people experienced.  Participants who were the most satisfied in their relationships in their 50s were the healthiest in their 80s.
  • Good relationships protect your brain. Participants who reported having good relationships and being in healthy marriages had minds that stayed sharper longer and they performed better on memory tests.

So back to our original question.  What makes a good life?  Rather than focusing on wealth, career or material possessions, the Harvard study shows that we would do well to focus on close, healthy relationships.  Again, Robert Waldinger: “…over and over, over these 75 years, our study has shown that the people who fared the best were the people who leaned in to relationships, with family, with friends, with community.”  Keep that in mind as you live life and plan for retirement.

~ Joe